Joan Didion describes in “Marrying Absurd” how Las Vegas’ experience of getting “married”, is completely meaningless. Didion claims this is because getting a marriage license is more business than it was before. Didion backs these claims with her derogatory tone and personal anecdotes as well as irony. These and other techniques have led Didion to repeatedly voice her opinion about Las Vegas’ marriage culture.

Joan Didion argues that Las Vegas’s “married” status is not a purposeful act. Didion’s best stance is her derogatory tone that disparages and criticizes many aspects of Las Vegas wedding industry. Didion has a major problem with the way Las Vegas wedding companies prioritize. For example, whereas a traditional marriage places importance on the experience, these “Stripchapels” put emphasis on cost and convenience, taking anywhere “…from three to five minutes” and “…five USD for the license” (Didion, 156,155). Didion’s dismissive tone is evident when she attacks the wedding industry’s focus on cost and convenience rather than the experience. These quotes also highlight how easy it for couples to get a married license. Didion’s main argument, which is that marriage permits are unnecessary because nearly everyone can get them, is supported, developed and expressed through the use critique. Didion’s use of irony is another literary device that she uses to support this claim. Irony is a rare literary device, but it can be used to support Didion’s main ideas. Joan Didion writes on page 156 that “Mr. Joan Didion says on page 156 that Brennan did…sixtysix in the office, and each couple was charged eight dollars.” This illustrates Didion’s use of irony. Because in this instance, a justice seems to be trying to break the record for signing more marriage licenses per hour. This quote also illustrates how easy it is to get married. Didion illustrates the simplicity of getting married by using irony, criticism, and other literary devices. Although it’s easier to get a Las Vegas license for marriage, it doesn’t mean that it should be difficult or cost-effective. A marriage is an once-in-a-lifetime experience. Therefore, it should be treated as such. (Didion156). The author’s main point is also mine. I think the process of obtaining a marriage license has become far too simple. Even if the process was perfect, it would be difficult to retain many of the traditional values and practices one should have in a marriage. The author’s main point is correct. A marriage should be something special that is carefully planned and planned for. Although Las Vegas has many advantages, including time and cost savings, it lacks key traditional traditions.

Joan Didion’s satire essay argues that Las Vegas marriage licenses are meaningless. She supported her claim using literary techniques such as tone, irony, and anecdotes. Didion created a well-written essay that convinced me to support her views.

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  • louiedawson

    Hi, my name is Louie Dawson and I'm an educational blogger and school teacher. I've been writing and teaching kids about stuff like math, science, history, and English since 2010. I hope you enjoy my work!

Joan Didion’s Novel “Marrying Absurd”: Summary And Analysis
louiedawson

louiedawson


Hi, my name is Louie Dawson and I'm an educational blogger and school teacher. I've been writing and teaching kids about stuff like math, science, history, and English since 2010. I hope you enjoy my work!


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